D2.1.a Compare and Contrast
There are four levels of measurement with respect to variables which are; nominal, dichotomous, ordinal, and normal (Morgan, Leech, Gloeckner, & Barrett, 2013). Nominal variables have characteristics of having three or more levels of measurement, not ordered, and consist of names or labels (Morgan et al., 2013). An example of a nominal variable would be “religion” whereby a 1 could represent catholic, a 2 could represent protestant, and a 3 could represent other (Morgan et al., 2013). Dichotomous variables have characteristics of having two levels of measurement that can be either ordered or unordered (Morgan et al., 2013). An example of a dichotomous variable would be “science scores (high versus low)” (Morgan et al., 2013). Ordinal values have characteristics of having three or more levels of measurement that are ordered and have unequal intervals between levels that are not normally distributed and are often skewed (Morgan et al., 2013). An example of ordinal variables would be “Father’s education” (Morgan et al., 2013). Normal variables have characteristics of having five or more levels of measurement that are ordered and that are approximately normally distributed with equal intervals between levels (Morgan et al., 2013). An example of a normal variable could be weight (Morgan et al., 2013).